Saturday, March 05, 2011

Apples, Apples, and More Apples


Bowl of Apples - oil - 11 x 14 - top
Two Apples - oil - 8 x 10 - middle
Study for Bowl of Apples - watercolor - 10.5 x 14 - bottom

I spent much of the month of February looking at, painting, and eating apples.

The bowl was particularly intriguing. I don't have that many bowls, for one thing, and I felt the colors in the bowl set off the apples enough to translate into a simplified yet striking painting.

My Dad gave me the bowl. He was a great collector of home decor. He would have liked that I painted it.

I used a complimentary underpainting of permanent magenta, which shows through in small, minute areas. I liked the permanent magenta so much I added it to my palette and used it throughout both paintings. It's an amazing color. Put it against just the right opposing color and whammo, it pops.

It's amazing how something as simple as an apple can be so challenging to paint. The complexity of simplicity continues to mystify me. As a painter, I've come to realize that the more spontaneously fresh a painting appears, the more planning went into it.

Well, off to another figure study, I've satisfied my craving for apples!

4 comments:

Katherine Thomas said...

Wow! These are amazing apples! I am in awe! Great job!

Bibi said...

Amazing!! See what you mean with Magenta letting it pop! Question, if I may: what would you use as complimentary colours to Rembrandt permanent Red purple (348) +++ and Rembrandt Perm. Madder Medium (395) +++? thanks!! Bibi

Bibi said...

Amazing!! See what you mean with Magenta letting it pop! Question, if I may: what would you use as complimentary colours to Rembrandt permanent Red purple (348) +++ and Rembrandt Perm. Madder Medium (395) +++? thanks!! Bibi

Marie Wise said...

Hi Bibi, thanks for your comment! Consider using a complimentary color for your underpaintings. So for a Red purple, the complimentary might be a Terra Verte or other pale green. Many artists also use a pinkish gray or a burnt sienna/transparent red ochre underpainting, as that seems to set off most any color. Good luck with your paintings!