Monday, July 27, 2009

A trip to the Getty


A Young Girl Defending Herself Against Eros, Adolphe William Bouguereau (top)
Irises, Vincent Van Gogh (bottom)

Our trip to a family reunion in Camarillo, California included a quick trip to the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. It was fabulous! We experienced Irises, the most breathtaking of Vincent Van Gogh's iris paintings, along with other Impressionist works by Monet, Degas and Cezanne. Since we had limited time, all we took in was the Painting wing.
I've been reading about Adolphe William Bouguereau, but had no idea I'd walk right into the French Renaissance room and come face to face with A Young Girl Defending Herself Against Eros! Seeing it up close reinforced what I'd read, Bouguereau was a master at flesh. Awesome.

The Getty allows photography as long as you don't use a flash, so I was able to capture some painting images, as well as the fabulous architecture and surrounding vistas. Here's my photo set, or watch the slide show. Enjoy!

Friday, July 17, 2009

Plein Aire Painting with Golden Open Acrylics


Plein Aire Painting done at workshop - Golden Open Acrylics on canvas paper - 8 x 10 (top)
Study from Plein Air painting - Golden Open Acrylics on poster board coated with Golden Molding Paste - 8 x 10 (second)
The actual scene (bottom)
Allan and I took a one day workshop sponsored by Art Media - Plein Aire Painting with Golden Open Acrylics, by Corrine Loomis-Dietz.
We both loved these paints. Read more about our workshop experience. Since it was a plein aire workshop, after the demonstration everyone went out into the courtyard of the Oregon Society of Artists (where the workshop was held) and painted from the landscape. By the time I got out there, all the good spots were taken, so I chose this scene of a tree in shadow (bottom image). However, I couldn't paint outside for very long, it was like 90 degrees, so I came into the studio and finished (top image).
The the instructor had us take one small area of our painting and blow it up onto a piece of cardboard coated with Golden Molding Paste. It was a slick surface, and I'm not sure I liked it, but it freed me up to paint with abandon (second image).
As always, while in workshops I have magnificent plans for all the paintings I'm going to do. But then I get home, am tired, and have six or so painting projects still unfinished. So I need to get busy on those. But I'd really like to buy a few tubes of Golden Open Acrylics and give them a try. I think not having to wait six months for a painting to dry would be heavenly! But then I have to decide whether I am a classical painter (oils), or a modern painter (acrylics). What's an artist to do?
~ I will keep the brush happy in my hand, no matter if I'm using oils, or acrylics! ~

Monday, July 13, 2009

Stretching, stapling and gessoing the mother of all canvases!

I spent my evenings last week stretching and stapling a 48" x 96" canvas for my painting Rhododendron Explosion, and now I'm working on the gessoing. It's the mother of all canvases--at least for me!

Stretching and stapling this canvas
Gessoing this canvas
The frame for this canvas

~ I will keep the brush happy in my hand ~

Sunday, July 12, 2009

Announcing My New Book: Power of the Wind!

Hello Friends,
I've taken the brave step into self-publishing and created my first book! Power of the Wind is the story of my three-year journey to create a series of paintings about wind energy. Just click the link below to preview it in my bookstore.

For all my wind energy friends who haven't been able to purchase a painting due to tight economic times, consider purchasing the book instead! You'll be able to see the whole collection of paintings and read how each one was inspired. The price is very reasonable at just $23 for a softcover copy, or $34 for a hardcover copy with dust jacket. The publisher will ship directly to you in a very timely manner! It makes a great gift!

So take care and let me know how you like it!

Sincerely, Marie Wise

~Yes, wind has a color, and it is the rainbow! ~










Marie Wise


By Marie Wise